Opinion | Quebec government inciting to snitch on fellow citizens is reminiscent of authoritarian regimes

The stranglehold is tightening on the people of Quebec, guilty of being social creatures who wish to live with dignity. Day after day, our leaders play with our freedoms like savant apprentices and their guinea pigs in the midst of dubious experimentation.

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Betting on arbitrary sacrifices rather than on true science, they hope to soften the virus and control nature as if they were God Almighty. Yet, behind this experimental ceremony, in essence, the citizens are dispossessed and alienated as if the very fact of their existence was being blamed on them. The certainty of life gives way to the original sin of the health crisis.

The excuse of the rulers: a health system that is full to bursting point, on the verge of imploding. Which is not entirely false. What they don’t say, however, is that the system has been at the breaking point for years. It is not the pandemic that is the cause of its functional incapacity; it is its intrinsic mediocrity and outdated state.

Yet the government refuses to confess this simple truth and gets bogged down in an authoritarian drift that escapes scientific common sense. As if, through coercion, the Quebec population were to pay for the inability of our health system to function normally, which is clearly unjust and unacceptable. The population is therefore being used as a scapegoat.

However, in recent days, the authoritarian drift has taken on particularly drastic proportions in Quebec. As if it were not enough to neutralize our national businesses and our Christian traditions, public authorities are now asking citizens to denounce their fellow citizens who do not entirely and absolutely abide by the public health rules.

Montreal’s mayor Valérie Plante set the ball rolling; Christian Dubé, Quebec’s health minister subsequently took over. From now on, it is advised by governments to spy on the private life of our fellow citizens in order to be absolutely certain that they are completely cowering in their “domestic cell”.

If they dare commit the crime of warmly inviting a relative, then the police force must be deployed against them. The rulers therefore encourage our citizens to suspiciously watch their neighborhood and send the police if social contacts are at work.

Of course, such practices make us think directly of dictatorial and totalitarian regimes, where privacy does not exist and the citizen must submit body and soul to the regime. However, this is not George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984, but the reality here in Quebec. Public authority ferments a toxic climate that has the effect of disintegrating the social fabric. Rather than betting on responsibility, governments rely on fear, coercion and systematic guilt. Instead of being side by side, the people of Quebec are now face to face.

Incitement to denunciation is a disastrous indicator of the state of affairs. Indeed, it tells us that our regime is moving away from its usual nature and that it is mutating into a particularly disturbing form. In order to mask the failure of our health care system and the inability to control the virus, our governments are neutralizing the national economy, alienating our fundamental freedoms and now encroaching on private space.

Private space is one of the main characteristics of our democratic regimes; we must immediately sound the alarm when the government tries to enter it and impose its arbitrary morality. In this case, the alarm resounds with all its might. Without private space, we are no longer in a democracy. Let us be aware of this.

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