Supermarkets in Wales forced to cover up non-essential items during lockdown

As Wales enters a second lockdown, First Minister of Wales and the Leader of the Welsh Labour Party Mark Drakeford has told supermarkets to stop selling non-essential items such as clothes as a matter of “fairness” until November 9. Drakeford said that supermarkets are only allowed to open parts of their business that sell essential goods.

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As Wales enters into a second national lockdown, stores that do not sell essential ideas such as food will be forced to close for 17 days. 

Under the law, businesses that provide a mixed set of services will be allowed to open if they cease conducting the service that must close under the lockdown mandated rules.

This means that stores like supermarkets that sell food along with other items will be forced to clear the shelves or create barriers to these items.

In addition, the “firebreak” lockdown also requires all people to stay at home. “Everyone in Wales will be required to stay at home.”

People are also not allowed to have “gatherings” indoors or outdoors with people you do not live with. The only exception is for people who live alone, these individuals can have one individual from another household visit them. 

First Minister of Wales and the Leader of the Welsh Labour Party Mark Drakeford has told supermarkets and stores that sell food to also stop selling items such as clothes as a matter of “fairness” until November 9, BBC reports

Drakeford said that supermarkets are only allowed to open parts of their business that sell essential goods. 

In response to the new policy from the government, Sara Jones the head of the Welsh Retail Consortium said “Compelling retailers to stop selling certain items, without them being told clearly what is and what isn’t permitted to be sold, is ill-conceived and short-sighted,”.

Andrew RT Davies, a member of the Welsh Conservatives Party responded on Twitter saying “The power is going to their heads.”

Since the lockdown began on Friday, shoppers in the region have posted on social media pictures of “non-essential items” behind barriers or covered with plastic sheeting. 

Others in the region are criticizing the government for what they deem to be a ridiculous or unfair policy. 

Some shoppers are fed up with the new public health restrictions and have taken into their own hands to remove the barriers in the stores. 

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