Trudeau’s Ramped Up Immigration Plan Has Support Of Only 17% Of Canadians

On October 30, Justin Trudeau’s government announced its plan “to support economic recovery through immigration”. The plan would increase immigration between 2021 to 2023 by more than 1.2 million immigrants to “compensate for the shortfall” of immigration due to the pandemic.

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A new survey by Nanos Research Group conducted for Bloomberg News shows that only 17% of respondents say Canada should accept more immigrants in 2021 than the country did last year.

Bloomberg says this suggests that “Canadians are less than enthusiastic about aggressive new targets” announced by the government on October 30.  

They found that the majority of Canadians do not want immigration levels to increase, and 36.3% want immigration levels to decrease. 

In a news release on October 30, Justin Trudeau’s government announced its plan “to support economic recovery through immigration” which includes bringing in more than 1.2 million immigrants between 2021 to 2023. 

The figure includes a yearly increase of about 50,000 to compensate for the shortfall in 2020 due to the pandemic, the Government stating that “the global travel restrictions and capacity constraints led to a shortfall in admissions over the last several months”. 

“To compensate for the shortfall and ensure Canada has the workers it needs to fill crucial labour market gaps and remain competitive on the world stage, the 2021 to 2023 levels plan aims to continue welcoming immigrants at a rate of about 1% of the population of Canada, including 401,000 permanent residents in 2021, 411,000 in 2022 and 421,000 in 2023. The previous plan set targets of 351,000 in 2021 and 361,000 in 2022.”

In the release, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Marco Mendicino states that “Immigration is essential to getting us through the pandemic, but also to our short-term economic recovery and our long-term economic growth. Canadians have seen how newcomers are playing an outsized role in our hospitals and care homes, and helping us to keep food on the table.”

Continuing, “As we look to recovery, newcomers create jobs not just by giving our businesses the skills they need to thrive, but also by starting businesses themselves. Our plan will help to address some of our most acute labour shortages and to grow our population to keep Canada competitive on the world stage.”

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